News & Views

15
Apr
The Coronavirus Is Changing the Future of Home, Work, and Life
The COVID-19 pandemic will be shaping how we live, work and learn about the world long after the last lockdown ends and toilet paper hoarding is done, accelerating shifts that were already underway including the dispersion of population out of the nation’s densest urban areas and the long-standing trend away 0 Comments
13
Apr
Density and Disease
Cities are, by definition, the “absence of physical space between people,” as Harvard economist Edward Glaeser describes them. Their success depends on the face-to-face contact now perilous to our health. Contagion turns the logic of cities on its head. “If you’re close enough to share an idea,” observes Glaeser, “you’re close enough to 0 Comments
hipster brooklyn
13
Apr
How coronavirus could forever change the look and feel of Australia’s cities and suburbs
How the pandemic might affect the way we make decisions on workplace location, transport modes, and shopping. 0 Comments
06
Apr
Why live in the suburbs? (from 1954)
An enjoyable read from way back in 1954 when the suburban growth boom was well and truly underway. But even back then, people were being criticised for loving suburbia. This Canadian article could have applied almost as equally to Australia. Read the full story here 0 Comments
27
Mar
The coming age of dispersion
“I don’t see the point of driving an hour to go from one computer screen to another.” That’s how one millenial views commuting life. In this fascinating new article author Joel Kotkin argues that the Coronavirus and work from home responses are only accelerating a trend already evident: the exodus 0 Comments
19
Mar
Ballarat and Bendigo are two of Australia’s most liveable regional cities
Thought about moving further out of Melbourne? Here’s another reason: Ballarat, in the Central Highlands of Victoria, has been named Australia’s most liveable regional city. It was closely followed by other Victorian regional cities with Bendigo and Geelong making up the top three ranking in the new RMIT Centre for Urban Reseach’s 0 Comments
16
Mar
1 million rides and counting: on-demand services bring public transport to the suburbs
The technology-driven revolution in urban transport is largely centred on the inner city. It has completely missed the suburbs, which lack the public transport services and shared micromobility devices, such as e-scooters, that inner-city residents enjoy. But new technologies, skilled operators and willing governments may have produced a solution for 0 Comments
16
Mar
What Jane Jacobs Got Wrong About Cities
“… though widely celebrated for her insights and unabashed embrace of dense urbanism, Jacobs may ultimately prove more influential than relevant. Her writing was often incisive and inspiring, particularly when she opposed planning and overdevelopment and embraced the role of middle-class families in cities. But the urban revival that has 0 Comments
SanFransisco
11
Mar
Studying the wrong cities will mean repeating their mistakes
Cities selected as exemplars for Australian planners and urban developers often have little in common with Australian cities, or more often than not have some glaring social issue – like homelessness or unaffordable housing – entirely glossed over. So why do we keep going to the same places for ideas? 0 Comments
25
Feb
The Luxury City Is Going Bust
“Even the world’s arguably most influential urbanist, scholar Richard Florida, agrees that the great urban revival is “over.” Since 2010, urban inner rings, including central business districts, accounted for barely 10 percent of population growth in the nation’s 53 largest metropolitan areas. More revealing still, the country’s three largest metropolitan areas — New 0 Comments